"Unwritten" Lyrics

Unwritten
by Natasha Bedingfield

I am unwritten, can’t read my mind, I’m undefined
I’m just beginning, the pen’s in my hand, ending unplanned

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten

Oh, oh, oh

I break tradition, sometimes my tries, are outside the lines
We’ve been conditioned to not make mistakes, but I can’t live that way

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins

Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins

Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten
The rest is still unwritten
The rest is still unwritten

Oh, yeah, yeah

Movie, Dirt, Feng Shui & Bali Connection?

The other day I was swooning over the movie I saw called Yes. One of the interesting themes in it is dirt. That’s right – dirt, and our attempts to get rid of it. (One really must see it to understand.) In the film, a cleaning lady gets very philosophical about dirt and breaks it down into some scientific jargon and microbiology. (I’m getting there… read on…)

Yesterday, I received two seemingly separate recommendations. The first was to read a book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui, by Karen Kingston, because I would like to understand my emotional attachment to my “stuff.” The other was to read anything I could find on Bali and the culture’s unique perspective about art, because I was talking about taking on some creative project.

I was amazed to begin my research and find that the author of the first book, Karen Kingston, lives part time in Bali, and even designed a hotel there using the principles of feng shui and Balinese principles. Upon further examination of her website, I found an interesting article written by her about – dirt.

Movie Night

I just finished watching a movie called Yes by Sally Potter. It’s a beautifully done film. The accents are strong, and the script is done in a poetic rhythm, so my Midwestern ears had a bit of trouble understanding every word. I didn’t want to miss anything, because the story was so philosophical and important, I think. I read on the website that the screenplay is available in a book form – maybe it’s worth a look. I would watch this film again and again, and I think I could learn something new every time.

A Lebanese man charms an American scientist who is in a loveless marriage. Their cultural and religious differences eventually cause some friction in this passionate affair. Sally Potter says on her website that she began to write this after 911, in order to address, in a creative way, the escalating issues between Americans and Middle Easterners.

I loved this film. My eyes are still wet.

Manhattan in December

I took this photo as Guy and I made our way to Ellis Island on the ferry from Liberty State Park. The line for the security check was long and sad. Amazing irony – standing in line to see the most famous lady in America, who symbolizes freedom… standing there, waiting to go through a rigorous examination of my personal belongings… removing my belt and my jacket and having some stranger x-ray my handbag… it was sad to see how our fears have kept our country so bound up. But anyway, New York was an emotional, exciting city to see. We made several trips into Manhattan, with a map and a positive attitude, and now I understand how the city is laid out. It’s really not too intimidating now that I have the picture in my mind. We drove in once, learned a lesson, and took the bus the other times. We walked the city, from downtown to Central Park, dreaming and exploring…

We decided to brave the crowds and go to Times Square for New Year’s Eve. Amazingly, we found last-minute tickets on the internet for Mamma Mia, which helped us get through several police barricades in order to get to the theater. After the show, we got lucky again and found a table for two at a charming French restaurant, where Guy helped me order (the staff spoke fluent French) a wonderful dinner. We had a glass of champagne and walked outside just in time to watch the fireworks as the ball dropped. Posted by Picasa

We particularly enjoyed the up-and-coming Meat Packing District with it’s trendy new shops and restaurants. We chose a great place called Nero for a memorable lunch one day. And at night, we experienced the artistic modern decor at the Hotel Gansevoort and the breath-taking view of New York City from the rooftop terrace.

On another trip, we took the children to visit the Museum of Modern Art, followed by a casual dinner at TGI Fridays on 5th Avenue.

Could this Indiana girl’s future rest among these massive buildings? I found a darling place with a very old vine climbing up the side which called out to my soul… I imagined filling up the rooms with my favorite special things. Is it possible for me to run a retail business, especially in New York City? It still seems too risky for me. Posted by Picasa

HAIL TO THE REDSKINS

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Redskins vs. Dallas at FedEx Field

Guy’s first American football game… 🙂 We took Laura and Sam, and we had club-level seats for this arch-rival game of the season. The time printed on the tickets was 1:00, but when we got there, the parking lot seemed fairly empty – not much going on. Then we realized that all the gates were closed! Finally I asked someone who told me the game time had been switched to 4:00 p.m. We had a drink outside, then went in when they opened the gates for lunch before the game.

It was a great game – very exciting with energy from the crowd that did not disappoint. The Redskins won – 35-17. Posted by Picasa

Laura’s Birthday

Laura looked beautiful on her birthday. We drank champagne and went to Russia House Restaurant in Herndon to celebrate. Posted by Picasa

Niki, Ana & Joey – August 2005

These photos were taken in Indiana over the summer of 2005. Ana was 12, Niki was 9 (almost 10), and Joey was 4. They look remarkably happy for kids whose parents are divorcing. I wonder how they will choose to write their stories? Who are they? Who will they become?Posted by Picasa

Crete, Greece

It would be impossible for me to accurately document my experience in this beautiful place – impossible to capture the charm of the streets and villages, the romance of the land, the sensuality of the strong sun, and the magnificent strength of the sea. The enormity of Crete’s deep history alone is more than the mind can grasp. Top all of this with a romance beyond all expectations and dreams, and no words exist to define it.

I began my stay in the area of Hersonissos… a small town called Koutouloufari – a hard-to-find place up a steep narrow street. I discovered this pearl of a place on the internet, and it was just perfect, this hotel called Creta Blue. The traditional Greek family who ran the place were welcoming and kind. Guy met me at the airport – our first face-to-face meeting. We checked myself into my hotel, then went into Hersonissos for margaritas. We never spent more than a few moments apart after that.

The central location of Hersonissos provided us with a good opportunity to visit other parts of the island. We ventured to Agios Nikolaus twice – once at night to enjoy the lights and restaurants, and once during the day to lie on the beach and look around. We also drove to Ierapetra, the southernmost town in all of Europe, where we enjoyed the architecture, the sunset, and a good meal. I took this picture of Guy there; the lighting at night was gorgeous against this old stone building along the coastline.

I did not book a hotel for the second part of the trip, but I had planned to work my way west on the island to the area of Chania and find something suitable on the way. Guy and I decided to stop at a travel agent’s office, where we met the lovely Diane. She happened to be from Wisconsin – the only other American I met the 12 days I was there. Diane found us a perfect place, after listening carefully to what we were looking for. Orestis Hotel is in Upper Stalos, a quaint village with authentic surroundings, barely touched by tourism. It’s a charming place, run by a gracious husband-and-wife team. At the pool, we were introduced to the music of Mario Frangoulis (via CD), which I liked very much. From our 3 balconies (yes, three) we could see the shoreline of Chania, along with groves of olive trees in the hills. Just at the bottom of our hill was this nice little beach where we took breakfast (well, usually lunch) almost every day. This is the photo with the parasols below.

In Chania, we found many charming shops and magnificent architecture. Along the shore, as we tried to decide where to dine, we found ourselves in a very busy section filled with tourists. Each restaurant had “pretty people” standing outside, trying to draw the people in. We kept walking, and continued along until we were on the other side of a big stone structure. It was suddenly quiet and not nearly as busy or lit up. We found a perfect spot for dinner, and later found it was highly recommended by the native Greek people.

Here is where I shopped for souvenirs. While there were dozens of jewelry shops, we searched until I found one that “felt” just right. They had a very patient, knowledgable staff. As I made my selections and the owner assisted in some detail work for me, we made friendly conversation and he eventually invited Guy and me to share a glass of Raki with him there in his shop. I had read that this happens sometimes, but I was charmed at this wonderful hospitality.

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One evening we chose to take a short sunset cruise to another tiny island off the coastline, where we posed for this photo. When we reached the island and anchored the boat, they served us fresh fruit and Raki while we watched the sun set over another small island in the distance.

This next photo is probably my most favorite one of the whole trip. This is not enhanced in any way – the colors of the sunset against the historical walls in Heraklion were breathtaking. Heraklion is the industrial capital of Crete, but it still has a unique beauty all its own. It was here where Guy and I had a final glass of our favorite Greek wine, Retsina, before we headed off to the airport for my flight home.